Statistics

Professor Braun has taught more than 625 undergraduate students and more than 275 graduate students in the following classes at Georgia Tech.

Current Courses

  • Planetary Entry (Spring 2016)
    This is a graduate level course focused on planetary entry, descent and landing. Course topics include entry mission and vehicle design, flight dynamics, hypersonic aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and thermal protection systems, aerodynamic decelerators, terminal descent and landing systems. Case studies include past and future mission concepts and technologies for robotic and human exploration.

Graduate Courses

In past semesters, Dr. Braun has taught the following graduate courses:

  • Orbital Mechanics (Fall 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008)
    This course is the first in a series of two graduate-level astrodynamics classes offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The course content includes historical background and equations of motion, two-body orbital mechanics, orbit determination, orbit prediction, orbital maneuvers, lunar and interplanetary trajectories, orbital rendezvous and space navigation.
  • Advanced Orbital Mechanics (Spring 2006)
    This course is the second in a two-part graduate-level astrodynamics sequence offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Course content includes universal variables and Gauss’ problem of orbit determination, the N-body problem, special orbits, non-spherical gravitational harmonics, orbital perturbations, low thrust trajectory analysis, differential corrections, midcourse maneuvers, space guidance and navigation. Orbital Mechanics is a pre-requisite.
  • Planetary Entry (Spring 2005, Spring 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2013, Fall 2014, Winter 2015 at Caltech, Spring 2016)
    This is a graduate level course focused on planetary entry, descent and landing. Course topics include entry mission and vehicle design, flight dynamics, hypersonic aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and thermal protection systems, aerodynamic decelerators, terminal descent and landing systems. Case studies include past and future mission concepts and technologies for robotic and human exploration.

Undergraduate Courses

In past semesters, Dr. Braun has taught the following undergraduate courses:

  • AE 2803: NASA in the 21st Century (Spring 2012)
    This course covers the challenges and fundamental physics of aerospace engineering, the historical development of aerospace capabilities, and budgetary and policy aspects of this sector. Students are expected to review and understand current-events aerospace literature, develop technology policy papers and then debate their merits. Students will interact with invited professionals in aerospace technology and policy and meet with some of our nation’s leading policymakers during a visit to Washington DC.
  • Space Systems Design II (Spring 2005, Spring 2005, Spring 2006, Spring 2007)
    AE 4357 is a second-semester course in a yearlong senior space systems design series. The class is divided into competing teams of 5-6 students who respond to an instructor-provided request for proposal. Students lead and manage each team, perform all design activities and prepare a proposal detailing their system concept. Each team completes their design concept and receives feedback through two external reviews. The highest-rated proposal is selected to represent Georgia Tech in one of several national space systems design competitions.
  • Space Flight Mechanics (Fall 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2009, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015)
    This is a first course in astrodynamics, designed for undergraduate students interested in space systems. The course content includes historical background and equations of motion, two-body orbital mechanics, orbit determination, orbital maneuvers, orbital prediction, interplanetary trajectories, launch vehicle performance and atmospheric entry.
  • Introduction to Aerospace Engineering (Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Fall 2009)
    This course provides an introduction to the field of aerospace engineering through a discussion of basic principles, aerospace disciplines and aerospace systems. Course content includes a historical perspective followed by an introduction to fluid mechanics, applied aerodynamics, propulsion, airplane performance, stability, orbital motion and launch vehicle performance. Recent advances in the aerospace field are also discussed. A team launch vehicle design and flight analysis project is assigned.

Continuing Education Short-Course

  • Planetary Entry, Descent and Landing
    This is a short-course providing an overview of planetary aeroassist technology, designed for program managers and non-specialists. Course topics span aerobraking, direct entry, aerocapture, past accomplishments in this field and the technology advances required for future missions. This seminar has been provided to personnel at JPL, NASA LaRC, NASA Ames, NASA MSFC, Boeing, Draper Labs and ESTEC.
 

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